"Last Night's Homework Was a Disaster!" September 13, 2014 16:00

Hearing the challenges that other parents experience at home with the nightly "Homework Madness" and the rather rapid transition to tranquility, speaks more for this program than anything I can say.  

I have asked my parents to share what they are observing at home, while they remove or try to remove themselves from homework.

I will be posting the observations of my parents as they transition into the "Homework Solutions" method of handling homework challenges.

Here are a few of the communications I have received thus far with only four days into homework:

This is from the first night of homework.  The following story is about an eight year old boy:

"My son had a very hard time with the spelling workbook on Monday night. He sat down to do the “riddle” section and reverted to a screaming like a 2 year old when he hit the question "today’s feel = yesterday’s ______.”

I know this was the stumper because he was reading it out loud after being unable to answer it silently. I said go on to the next one if he couldn’t figure it out, and the next one was about the 3 little pigs story. In the age of iPads, I guess we missed harping on the Mother Goose rhymes and other fables with him, and this particular story was not in his vocabulary. I was across the table working on a big presentation for Tuesday morning, and he could not handle the fact that I wouldn’t get up from behind my computer and come read the workbook with him. If I hadn’t been so busy working furiously to polish off my own work, I just might have been tempted to do so! He gradually worked it all out by process of elimination I guess, because when I asked after school Tuesday if anyone else brought their workbook to school with answers missing (figuring he would be one) he said he got it all filled in. But it took many rounds of pausing the NFL game, fighting, going upstairs for a shower, trying again on the homework, pausing the game, bellyaching about how stupid the workbook/homework is, pacing around to cool off, threatening to throw the book in the messy kitchen trash bin, and finally just getting it done. "

The next day, the children shared the challenges they had with the previous night's homework. He was not alone.  I actually threw a temper tantrum to demonstrate what some children have done in the past.  They laughed at the absurdity of my actions.  Then they shared how they solved the challenges.  This young man shared that he used process of elimination to solve the problem, but neglected to share the hissy fit he did before he solved it.  

I received the following email the next day: 

"Tuesday was a completely different story. He didn’t even ask to watch TV first. He just sat right down at the table, took out his book, and plugged away at what looked like a math worksheet. Didn’t ask for help once."

Yes, the transition to tranquility can be that fast with the right tools.