Technology Time Management Strategies

Technology Time Management Strategies

Tech Management Strategies That Get Buy-in By Children

Before students begin to schedule themselves they need to understand the following:

  • Their brains form and prune dendrites, which helps build memories and recall information
  • There are chemicals emitted during game playing that are needed for concentration and proper healthy sleep 
  • The brain needs a break after video game playing to maximize their study time and sleep
  • Scheduling games before study times and before they go to sleep will make studying harder and make it more difficult to remember what was learned the night before.

Scheduling their game playing requires an understanding of time. Because their prefrontal cortexes are not formed fully, it is difficult to schedule themselves automatically, but they can be trained how to do it. Firstly, they need to see what time looks like. Providing them a daily schedule broken into fifteen minute increments for the time represented when they leave school until their bedtime is not enough. To a poor time manager, the scheduler below gives them a false sense of having a lot of time.

So, we need to help students see time differently. To manage tech, they need to think about all the other things in their day they need to consider that they normally wouldn’t think about. The first part of time management training is to make a list of all outside activities they have after school. Ask the children to fill in the times they have to set aside for extra-curricular activities and chores.

Most students do not consider all the time wasters that result in finding themselves out of time. They need to put time to travel, dress, eat, bathe, and the need to add extra minutes to each task to allow for unexpected challenges.

To a poor time manager this schedule has a lot of white space that gives them a false sense that they still have a lot of free time. We need to show students how little time they have. When I began highlighting unavailable time, it created a sense of urgency in my poor time managers to get to work right away.



Now this student has a better sense of the actual time left to study, do homework, or play a video game.

When scheduling their game playing, they have to take into consideration how much brain rest they need to be effective with their other responsibilities. If they play for fifteen minutes, they should allow a minimum of 30 minutes of brain rest from video games before attempting to study or complete assignments. They will need to have at least an hour of brain rest prior to going to sleep to maximize their recall of information learned that night. Looking at this schedule, my student decided he could play for fifteen minutes before he went to soccer practice. He considered everything he needed to do before he could play, such as get into his soccer clothes. He also stated, "If I play for fifteen minutes and go to soccer, that will give my brain enough rest so I can concentrate on my homework when I get home." On another day, he announced, "Doesn't look like I have any game time in my future today." 

When they understand that their brain functioning can be compromised by playing the game, they will gladly make appropriate decisions. Ask the students if they would like to remember tomorrow what they study tonight. Video game playing before going to bed can impact their brain’s ability to get the right kind of sleep that promotes easy recall the next day.  Ask them if they want to waste their time by playing a game and risking not remembering what they tried learning the night before. They will usually make the choice of planning their game playing when it won’t impact learning and sleep. After they have assigned times to each activity they need to complete for the evening, they are ready to decide when and if they have the time to play games.

Empowering them to make these decisions about game playing will serve them well when they are alone in their dorm room with no one monitoring them. 

Next Blog will deal with the advertising strategies game makers use to capture our children's attention.